[one_third last=”no” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””]

freight

[/one_third][two_third last=”yes” spacing=”yes” center_content=”no” hide_on_mobile=”no” background_color=”” background_image=”” background_repeat=”no-repeat” background_position=”left top” hover_type=”none” link=”” border_position=”all” border_size=”0px” border_color=”” border_style=”” padding=”” margin_top=”” margin_bottom=”” animation_type=”” animation_direction=”” animation_speed=”0.1″ animation_offset=”” class=”” id=””]

Berrio was one of the ships in the fleet of Vasco Da Gama’s expedition to find a sea route to India. It was called so because it was sold to King Manuel I, to join the fleet in India by its owner, D. Manuel de Berrio – a respected pilot from Lagos at the time.

It was a Latin caravel – wore triangular sails luff enabling it best – robust and fast, 30 meters long, three-masted and 50 barrels capacity (1 barrel equals about 1,000 liters), equivalent to about 50 tons.

The Berrio left Lisbon on July 8, 1497, along with the ships San Gabriel and San Rafael – vessels used round sails, each with 90 tanks, as well as a carrack of 110 tons groceries with no name or San Miguel, according to some historians.

Being the lighter and faster of the fleet, it was the first vessel to return to Lisbon on July 10, 1499 under the command of Nicholas Coelho and having a pilot Pero Escobar, who would later accompany the fleet of Pedro Alvares Cabral in his trip discovery of Brazil in 1500.

[/two_third]